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A week at the airport by Alain de Botton

week-at-the-airportBlurb:

In the summer of 2009, Alain de Botton will be invited by the owners of Heathrow airport to become their first ever Writer in Residence. He will be installed in the middle of Terminal 5 on a raised platform with a laptop connected to screens, enabling passengers to see what he is writing and to come and share their stories. He will meet travellers from around the world, and will be given unprecedented access to wander the airport and speak with everyone from window cleaners and baggage handlers to air traffic controllers and cabin crew. Working with the renowned documentary photographer Richard Baker, de Botton will produce an extraordinary meditation upon the nature of place, time, and our daily lives. He will explore the magical and the mundane, personal and collective experiences and the interactions of travellers and workers all over this familiar but mysterious site. Like all airports, Heathrow (the 15th century village of Heath Row lies beneath the short stay car park) is a ‘non-place’ that we by definition want to leave, but it also provides a window into many worlds – through the thousands of people it dispatches every day. "A Week at the Airport" is sure to delight de Botton’s large following, and anyone interested in the stories behind the way we live.


In a nutshell:

I read it in: English

I liked it:  x Yes       No

For people who like: Alain de Botton in general, philosophical chatter, airports, travel


My thoughts: 

I love airports. Every time I travel by plane – provided there are no kids with me –, I try to get connecting flights that are not so close that I would have to run from gate to gate without the possibility to spend some time at the airport. So the first sentence of “A week at the airport” struck a chord with me.

While punctuality lies at the heart of what we typically understand by a good trip, I have often longed for my plane to be delayed – so that I might be forced to spend a bit more time at the airport.

From the beginning to the end this was a pleasure to read. I have always been interested in everything travel related so this book was just right for me. Working in the hospitality industry myself I very much enjoyed reading the chapters about his stay at the Sofitel and the training of customer service staff especially. When Alain de Botton describes how beautiful the meals on a hotel menu sound, a beauty that surpasses that of any haiku of the masters; when he wonders about the “scribe” who comes up with those flowery descriptions; and when you then start to think about a colleague of yours who sits in his small chef’s office writing his menus for the day, you can’t help but chuckle.

My line of work has made me very receptive to passages like this one which is all too true:

Though one can inculcate competence, it is impossible to legislate for humanity. In other words, the airline’s survival depended upon qualities that the company itself could not produce or control, and was not even, strictly speaking, paying for. The real origins of these qualities lay not in training courses or employee benefits but, for example, in the loving atmosphere that had reigned a quarter of a century earlier in a house in Cheshire, where two parents had brought up  a future staff member with benevolence and humour – all so that today, without any thanks being given to those parents […] he would have both the will and the wherewithal to reassure an anxious student on her way to the gate to catch BA048 to Philadelphia.

Alain de Botton describes his week at the airport starting from departure to airside to arrivals in small chapters and paragraphs talking about this and that covering a lot of topics, none of them in depth but enough to make you wish to know more. As far as I am concerned the book could have been much much thicker. A mere 107 pages wasn’t nearly long enough. I would have liked to read on and on.

Location: Heathrow Airport, England, UK

heathrow1 heathrow2 heathrow3 heathrow4

All images from wikipedia

Product info and buy link :

Title A week at the airport
Author Alain de Botton
Publisher Vintage
ISBN 978-0307739674
I got this book from Birgit at The Book Garden as a RAK
Buy link Buy A Week at the Airport
More info Heathrow’s website
and more Alain de Botton’s website
and more 5 minutes with Alain de Botton interview

 

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? I would love to hear other opinions.

Article

Week on the web #4

weekontheweb

My finds for this week…

Article

The Dragon and the Pearl by Jeannie Lin

The dragon and the pearlBlurb:

Former Emperor’s consort Ling Suyin is renowned for her beauty; the ultimate seductress. Now she lives quietly alone—until the most ruthless warlord in the region comes and steals her away….
Li Tao lives life by the sword, and is trapped in the treacherous, lethal world of politics. The alluring Ling Suyin is at the center of the web. He must uncover her mystery without falling under her spell—yet her innocence calls out to him. How cruel if she, of all women, can entrance the man behind the legend…

 

 

 


 

In a nutshell:

I read it in: English

I liked it:     Yes    x  No  The book was a DNF for me.

For people who like: typical romance, ancient China


My thoughts: 

It seems I am having to deal with more DNFs than usual at the moment. Not sure why this is, the books that I did not finish were not at all comparable. Anyway, this one was yet another DNF for me.

I got “The Dragon and the Pearl” because I found the cover adorable. Not a very good reason to get a book (some people might disagree, I know), and it did turn out to be the wrong one here.

The story starts medias in res with Li Tao coming for Suyin and takes her with him to his own mansion deep in the forest. The perfect setting for a blossoming romance, isn’t it. And here we go! From the first moment Suyin was drawn to Li Tao and her heart started beating faster whenever he came near. It is very much possible that Li Tao felt the same way, as  he always got this gleam in his eyes when he set them on her. Needless to say he was muscled, hard as a rock, pure masculine power. I was only waiting for the term “predator” to crop up and I was not disappointed. It was in chapter three and appeared in the form of a “predatory glint” in his eyes. Two lines before that he “prowled” closer, which had me wondering once more why a man who “prowls” seems so desirable to some women (and romance authors).

Very soon after I decided to stop reading. I am sure had I gotten to the love scenes I would have encountered “molten lava” in abundance – or something similar, I am not sure whether Christine Feehan has the monopoly on molten lava or not.

Romance lovers will devour this book I am sure, especially since the setting is interesting and unusual. Maybe I was just disappointed because I expected the story to be different (why, I can’t say) and instead I only got the ordinary romance formula.

Location: Ancient China, capital Chang’an (now: Xi’an)

Map of China, Chang'an Wild Goose Pagoda, 652AD Mount Huashan near Chang'an

Images from wikipedia

Product info and buy link :

Title The Dragon and the Pearl
Author Jeannie Lin
Publisher Harlequin
ISBN 9780373296620
I got this book from Netgalley, because I found the cover very appealing
Buy link Buy The Dragon and the Pearl
More info Jeannie Lin’s website

 

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? I would love to hear other opinions.

Article

Needlework Tuesday: Crochet wire necklace

After the red and black necklace from last week I made another one with a slightly different technique. This one consists of three different strands that are twisted together at both ends, whereas the first one was one long strand that was “folded up”. The advantage of the first one: there is no fiddling to twist and get the strands together. The advantage of the second one: you can add beads along the way if you notice you haven’t started out with enough.

Crochet wire necklace

Last week Tami asked for instructions. I found two which are quite helpful:

Basically what you do is you thread the beads and then start stitching chains and always push one bead to the hook and add it to your chain stitch. It sounds and looks more complicated than it is.

    The easy way is to do it like this (sorry for the more than simple looking image):wire_necklace
    All you need to make sure is that you have enough beads threaded to last for the intended length of the necklace. You crochet the whole length in one go and “fold” the strands in the required length and keep them in place with a safety pin on both ends. When you finish you just clasp the ends of all strands and put them on two jump rings and attach a fastener. That’s it!

    Join us for Needlework Tuesday which is hosted by Heather from Books and Quilts.

Article

In my mailbox


Hosted by The Story Siren

This week my mailbox was quite empty, but that is ok. I have enough to read to keep me busy for a long time.

I got as a gift

 “A week  at the airport” by Alain de Botton. Birgit from The Book Garden gave me that as a RAK in August, but TBD is so slow in the first place and then the book got lost and had to be re-sent, so it took a while. But better late than never. Thank you so much, Birgit!

 

week-at-the-airport 

What was in YOUR mailbox recently?  Check out other In my mailbox participants here.

Article

Banned books week hop

Welcome to the Banned Books Week Hop!

Banned Books Week is a US event. I have to admit that the practice of banning or challenging books is unknown to me, at least in recent times. Except for one mother in 12th or 13th grade who opposed to us reading “Les liaisons dangereuses” by Choderlos de Laclos in French class – a fact that made me go and read the book right away, of course – I have never heard of a book being challenged or banned from schools, libraries or shops. It seems, in the US it is not so uncommon. So I am all too willing to support Banned Books Week and this hop with a giveaway. You can find out more about Banned Books Week at the official Banned Books Week website.

The Banned Books Week Hop is organized by I am a reader, not a writer and I read banned books. Make sure you check out their blogs!

What am I giving away?

No, it’s neither a classic, nor a YA novel, it’s a children’s book (a classic in its own right). A book that I love, that I read to my kids frequently, a book everybody should know. It is called “The Lorax”.

As unbelievable as it sounds, “The Lorax” was banned in 1989 by the Laytonville, Calif. Unified School District because it "criminalizes the foresting industry". No, it doesn’t. If anything, it criminalizes entrepreneurs who exploit nature without making sure to replenish by re-planting.

The Lorax cover

If you would like to know more about the Lorax, please read my post about The Lorax Project. The beginning of The Lorax is featured in this Book beginnings on Fridays post.

I hope you are enjoying your stay at my blog and have a look around. If you would like to know about future giveaways and new posts in general please consider subscribing to my RSS feed or follow me on twitter. You can also add me on Google+.

 
Enter the giveaway

 

You can find more info on banned books at the following sites:
The other participants:

Sorry, the list is no longer available. 

Article

Book beginnings on Friday

mww

Today’s book beginning is from a book by Ernest Hemingway that is on my reading list for the very near future, “Men without women”. The beginning  is from the first story called “The Undefeated”.

Manuel Garcia climbed the stairs to Don Miguel Retana’s office. He set down his suitcase and knocked on the door. There was no answer. Manuel, standing in the hallway felt there was someone in the room. He felt it through the door.

I haven’t read on and I don’t know what the story is about. I like the beginning.

What is YOUR book beginning today? To see more book beginnings go to A few more pages!

Article

Visitation by Jenny Erpenbeck

visitation1Blurb:

A bestseller in Germany, Visitation has established Jenny Erpenbeck as one of Europe’s most significant contemporary authors. A house on the forested bank of a Brandenburg lake outside Berlin (once belonging to Erpenbeck’s grandparents) is the focus of this compact, beautiful novel. Encompassing over one hundred years of German history, from the nineteenth century to the Weimar Republic, from World War II to the Socialist German Democratic Republic, and finally reunification and its aftermath, Visitation offers the life stories of twelve individuals who seek to make their home in this one magical little house. The novel breaks into the everyday life of the house and shimmers through it, while relating the passions and fates of its inhabitants. Elegant and poetic, Visitation forms a literary mosaic of the last century, tearing open wounds and offering moments of reconciliation, with its drama and its exquisite evocation of a landscape no political upheaval can truly change.


In a nutshell:

I read it in: German

I liked it:  x  Yes and  x   No  The book was a DNF for me.

For people who like: historical topics, clean and cold language without a word too many, modern German literature


My thoughts: 

I wanted to like this book, and in a strange way I did and then again I didn’t. It is the story of a house at a lake in Germany and its inhabitants over the course of time (see my Book beginnings on Friday post). The language is very clean, detached and cold. There is not one word too many and everything is made very clear to the reader. I could picture everything perfectly, the house, the gardener, the lake, the bathhouse, the inhabitants.

However, I decided to stop reading it. I haven’t come very far, so it could be that my decision was entirely wrong, but I just don’t want to spend my time reading stories that are too depressing for words. In the few chapters I read there were Jews getting murdered in a concentration camp, a little Jewish girl getting shot after hiding in a box on her own for a long time, a German woman getting raped by Russian soldiers. Well, you might say that that is what that time was like so I can’t expect anything different. True! It may well be that the following period with the house being in the German Democratic Republic would have been a cheerful read, but seriously, I couldn’t imagine that.

Somehow I think that the German title “Heimsuchung” (which has a somewhat sinister and terrifying connotation) refers to the dreadful misfortune that befalls the house’s inhabitants. As brilliant the book might be, I just found it neither entertaining in a relaxing sort of way nor captivating enough for me to read on. Maybe this was just not the right time for me to read it. If you are looking for a light read that leaves you ready to go to sleep happily, this is not the book for you.

Location: Scharmützelsee, Brandenburg, Germany

Scharmützelsee

Image from wikipedia

Product info and buy link :

Title Visitation
Author Jenny Erpenbeck
Publisher New Directions
ISBN 978-0811218351
I got this book my German swap site
Buy link Buy Visitation
More info English page on the German publisher’s site

 

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? I would love to hear other opinions.

A very good review in German at “der Freitag”

Article

Week on the web #3

weekontheweb

Here are my finds for this week…

Article

Needlework Tuesday: Crochet necklace

This week I tried out a crochet technique to create necklaces. It’s not one of those tight crochet bead necklaces that you need a lot of patience for, but the easy, quick kind. I got this little book from the library that teaches you various techniques and this one here is as easy as one, two, three.

All you need is wire, a crochet hook, small beads and the knowledge how to crochet chain stitches. That is all there is to it!

Crochet necklace

Image template from pugly pixel

Have you ever crocheted necklaces? Or anything else with wire? Let me see, I am curious!

Join us for Needlework Tuesday which is hosted by Heather from Books and Quilts.

Article

Broadening the horizon

    New ideas for my teleidoscope:
  • It’s not a conscious decision that I made nor was it a mere accident. I noticed that on netgalley they have quite a few Dark Horse Comics available. One of them caught my eye because I remembered that I had seen that sort of cover in our house before. So I asked my husband whether he would want to blog about the newest B.P.R.D. graphic novel “Being human”. Answer: yes! See how easy it sometimes is to find a co-blogger! John is an avid reader with a very eclectic taste and – other than me, I only read Archie – he loves comics/graphic novels. So I “hired” him to talk about graphic novels on my teleidoscope from time to time now.
    His first review will be coming up soon.
  • Also I added a new feature to my book reviews. Whenever a book is set in a certain location I will add a few images of that location and maybe a map. That way you can picture the whole story better in your mind (or at least I can). Examples are my posts about “Murder on the Flying Scotsman” and “I wish someone were waiting for me somewhere”.
  • Plus, I am adding additional info (videos, author websites, lists of books in order etc.), if there is any, to the product info area.
  • And this new idea popped into my head today when I saw a bookstore bingo tweet about “A moveable feast”. In the future, when there is a bookstore bingo tweet about a specific book or author I will add it to the bottom of the post. Example can be seen here in my post about “A moveable feast”. Not that it will be particularly helpful, but it’s fun!
  • The Steampunk Challenge will be coming to a close soon, and I am planning a new reading project for 2012. I am not calling it a challenge, as it is not that big and limited to a small number of specific books. Check back in October for more info.
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Quizzical Monday

quizzical_monday

It’s time for another “Quizzical Monday”!

Question:

Today it is about poetry. Who are the three great masters of Haiku?

Leave a comment with your answer. Then, to see whether you got it right,  click on "Show" below.  As usual, there is nothing to be won, this is just for fun! Thanks for playing

Answer SelectShow
Article

In my mailbox


Hosted by The Story Siren 

I feel like I have so many books to read and don’t need anymore at the moment. However, I keep ordering them one way or the other…

 

I swapped

  • “Je voudrais que quelqu’un m’attende quelque part” by Anna Gavalda. My first venture into reading French after many years. I blogged about the book already after I read in German a few days ago here.   

I got as a gift

From the library

They had a few more Daisy Dalrymple mysteries at the library, so I got three of them in German for VERY easy reading. They will balance the French Gavalda book nicely.

 

 Je voudrais que quelqu'un m'attende quelque part The lady with the dog Death at Wentwater Court

Dead in the water Miss Daisy und der tote Professor

What was in YOUR mailbox recently?  Check out other In my mailbox participants here.

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Weekend cooking: Sweet potato cheesecake

In my last weekend cooking post I already told you about Annik’s divine cakes and gave you the recipe for a super easy cake made from puff pastry.

Today I finally MADE something myself from the book and it turned out rather fantastic.

It is called “Sweet potato cheesecake” and takes a bit of time, but it is worth it.

 

Sweet potato cheesecakeannikskuchen

Ingredients:

For the bottom: 

  • 120g wholemeal butter cookies (the regular wheat flour kind looks like the one on the picture on the right)
  • 70g walnuts, chopped roughly
  • 80g sugar
  • 1 tsp molasses
  • 60g liquid butter

For the filling:Butterkeks

  • 400g sweet potatoes
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 255g sugar
  • 700g cream cheese, the fatty kind
  • 200g Mascarpone
  • 1 tbsp molasses
  • 1 tiny pinch of ground vanilla
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 2 tbsp corn starch

For the coating:

  • 300g sour cream
  • 50g sugar
  • 1 pinch ground vanilla

For the icing (I left that away):

  • 70g caramel candy
  • 2 tbsp cream

cheesecake

    0. I started with making a pot of coffee to keep me awake. As you know I am not a passionate baker.
    1. For the bottom grind the cookies finely or crumble them up in a freezer bag. Roast the walnuts in a pan without any oil or fat.
    2. Mix cookie crumbs, nuts, sugar and molasses and add the liquid butter. Stir until everything is humid. Spread evenly on the bottom of the round baking pan and press down firmly.
    3. For the filling peel and cut the sweet potatoes into cubes. Boil them in a pot with water and a bit of salt and 1 tbsp of sugar until soft.
    4. Drain the water and mash potatoes. Use 300g of the mashed sweet potatoes. Eat the rest, it is yummy! Heat up the oven to 130C.
    5. Mix cream cheese and mascarpone in a bowl with your hand mixer at medium speed. Add sweet potatoes, 240g sugar, molasses, vanilla, cinnamon and salt. Then add the eggs and at the end corn starch. Once you add the eggs only mix until homogenous. Otherwise the batter will be too airy, would rise too much and then collapse again.
    6. Spread cream cheese mixture evenly on the bottom of the cake. Bake 60 minutes at 130C. After that the cake should still move a little in the middle when you push against the edge of the pan. It will get completely firm when it cools down.
    7. Before the end of the baking time, mix sour cream, vanilla and sugar until smooth. Spread on the baked cake and bake another 5 minutes. Turn oven off and let the cake sit in there for another two hours. Do not open the oven if possible! Take out and let cool down at room temperature.
    8. For the caramel icing grind the candy and melt in a pot together with the cream at low heat while stirring all the time. To decorate, spread over the cake with a little spoon.
    Enjoy!
    Cookie image from wikipedia. Photo template from pugly pixel.
Article

Book beginnings on Friday

The mysteries of Pittsburgh 

Today’s book beginning is from a novel that I read a long, long time ago. I looked around for a book (I am still reading “Visitation” from last week, so nothing new to choose) and my eye fell on “The Mysteries of Pittsburgh” by Michael Chabon. I remembered that it had a really great first sentence. Most of you probably know it anyway. So, here we go:

At the beginning of the summer I had lunch with my father, the gangster, who was in town for the weekend to transact some of his vague business.

What is YOUR book beginning today? To see more book beginnings go to A few more pages!

Article

Week on the web #2

weekontheweb

Here are my finds for this week…

Article

An unequal fight

Unequal fight

I couldn’t really call this post “What I like…besides books” because playing with Playmobil is not really one of my hobbies, however, I do spend quite a bit of  time doing it.

As you can see a fierce battle is about to start. Needless to say the strong and well-equipped army of knights and soldiers in the temple belongs to my son whereas the motley crew of peasants, civilians without any weapons and poor sods without even a brain belongs to me… Some reading on asymmetric warfare is in order.

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Needlework Tuesday: Crochet basket

OK, I decided to stop working on the crochet socks. Why? Well, first of all, crocheting socks is dead boring. By the time I got to the heel I was already fed up with it. Second, I was not looking forward to doing ANOTHER sock after the first one. I just hate doing the same thing twice with the same yarn. So, no homemade crochet socks for me.

Instead I looked around and found a super easy pattern for a little notions bowl at Ravelry. You can also find the pattern directly at Barb’s patterns if you are no Ravelry member. I use the bowl for small jewellery items and think it’s pretty cute, especially with that purple-cream yarn.

crochet_basket

Image template from pugly pixel

What have you made recently? Join us for Needlework Tuesday which is hosted by Heather from Books and Quilts.

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I wish someone were waiting for me somewhere by Anna Gavalda

Ich wünsche mir, dass irgendwo jemand auf mich wartet Blurb (from Goodreads):

Hailed by Voici as "a distant descendant of Dorothy Parker," prize-winning Anna Gavalda has caused an international sensation with this dazzling collection of short stories selling over 700,000 copies in her native France. With arresting naturalism, a lively variety of perspectives, Gavalda writes simply–and beautifully–of human beings longing to connect. Gavalda has a knack for capturing our inner as well as our outer dialogues with perfect pitch, provoking reflection, pain, and laughter in equal measure. The stories in I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere are as wicked as they are insightful, as stylish as they are sparse, as fiercely unsentimental as they are emotionally wrought.

 


In a nutshell:

I liked it:  x   Yes       No

For people who like: French literature, short stories about human relationships of any kind


My thoughts: 

I was going to read this book for “Paris in July” but then I never got around to doing it during summer. But better late than never. I have never read anything by Anna Gavalda, but this little book with short stories turned me into a fan.

Courting Rituals of the Saint-Germain-des-Prés (Petites pratiques germanopratines)

A very short story about a chance encounter, the following dinner and a wrong glance at the wrong time that breaks the deal. I loved it. We don’t know whether the deal breaker came as a welcome excuse or not, but it certainly shows that even a moment as short as a nanosecond can ruin your evening.

Pregnant (I.I.G.)

The German title of this story “Ungewollter Schwangerschaftsabbruch” (Unwanted termination of pregnancy) gives a much clearer hint as to what happens in this story. It made me uncomfortable from page 1 and I checked the original title to see whether the German or the English translator took some liberty here. In fact, it was the English one, as the original title is I.I.G. which, I suppose, stands for “Interruption Involontaire de Grossesse” which means “involuntary interruption of pregnancy”. From the start I knew where this was going, however, the end is even worse than I imagined.

This  Man and This Woman (Cet homme et cette femme)

On only three and a half pages we learn about the rather dreadful life of a rich couple. They are lost in their own trains of thought. Pretty frightening!

The Opel Touch (The Opel Touch)

A young student who works in a shop to make some money on the side is having a crisis due to the lack of love in her life. Her sister comes to the rescue.  “The Opel Touch” is such a good title for this story. I think we all know those situations and can relate.

Amber (Ambre)

While I was reading this story I was wondering continuously whether it would have a good or bad ending. I wanted it to end well so badly. Only the last line gives us some sort of clue.

Leave (Permission)

Another good story about the rivalry between brothers, the one a recruit on home leave, the other a golden boy, about a girl. The ending is slightly different from what you might expect. Oh, btw, the book title is taken from this story.

Lead Story (Le fait du jour)

This is about a man who finds out that he is responsible for a big traffic accident with many people dead or injured. Most of the stories in the book are open ended and as far as I am concerned this is a good thing. The events and reflections are already bad enough, I wouldn’t want to know any consequences.

Catgut (Catgut)

Definitely a spin on the “woman gets raped” topic. I liked the calmness and courage very much in which the woman gets her revenge on the rapists.

Junior (Junior)

OMG, what a fun story! I can just imagine the scene. Again, the open end becomes the story, you wouldn’t want to see the fit the boy’s father will go into in the morning. What do we learn from this story? Even though it might decrease your chances to cop off better take the old Vauxhall than your dad’s Jaguar to a party.

For Years (Pendant des années)

A very melancholic story about two ex-lovers who meet again after twelve years.

Clic-Clac (Clic-Clac)

Again this is about a blossoming love and how the two people get together.  I really liked the main character and his two sisters. The whole story is quite realistic, too. Why “Clic-Clac”? It’s the name of the newly bought IKEA sofa-bed.

Epilogue (Epilogue)

An author (presumably AG herself) tries to sell her book with short stories to a publishing house.  The invitation to meet the publisher turns out to be a little different than what she expected.

I was so pleased with those stories that I swapped the original French version and will give it a go. I think the stories are short enough that I will be able to stick to one at a time and the French won’t be so convoluted and complicated that it will be too hard to understand. Wow, this will be the first time in about 20 years for me to read a French book, I am really looking forward to that.

 

Location: France

Les Deux Magots, Saint-Germain-des-Prés  Melun Sully-sur_Loire

All images from wikipedia

Product info and buy link :

Title I wish someone were waiting for me somewhere
Author Anna Gavalda
Publisher Riverhead Trade
ISBN 1573223557
I got this book from my German swap site for “Paris in July” but never got around to reading it then
Buy link Buy I Wish Someone Were Waiting for Me Somewhere
More info Interview with Anna Gavalda in French (but dubbed German)

 

Have you read this book? What did you think of it? I would love to hear other opinions.

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Quizzical Monday 4

quizzical_monday

It’s time for another “Quizzical Monday”!

Question:

From 1962 until her death Marion Zimmer Bradley wrote a sci-fi series about the story of a planet? What do the inhabitants call the planet and what is the Terran name for it?

To see the answer click on "Show" below.  As usual, there is nothing to be won, this is just for fun!

Answer SelectShow
Article

In my mailbox


Hosted by The Story Siren 

 

I swapped

  • The only book I got this week is “Maybe this time” by Alois Hotschnig. It is a collection of short stories that I got in the original German where it is called “Die Kinder beruhigte das nicht” (It didn’t calm down the kids). The German title indicates that the stories might be at least slightly disturbing, the English title doesn’t tell me much.

 Die Kinder beruhigte das nicht

 

What was in YOUR mailbox recently?  Check out other In my mailbox participants here.

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Book beginnings on Friday

visitation1

Today’s book beginning is from a book I started some time ago. It is called “Visitation” in English, the original German title is “Heimsuchung” by Jenny Erpenbeck.

It is the story of a house and its various owners over the course of roughly hundred years.

No one in the village knows where he comes from.  Perhaps he was always here.

The German beginning goes like this:

Woher er gekommen ist, weiß im Dorf niemand. Vielleicht war er immer schon da.

“He” is the gardener who is taking care of the garden of the house throughout the book.

What is YOUR book beginning today? To see more book beginnings go to A few more pages!

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Week on the web #1

weekontheweb

Another new feature on my blog…. I usually display interesting posts and articles and such (at least interesting to me) in my sidebar under “What others are talking about”. In order to give them a bit more exposure I decided to list them in a weekly post called “week on the web”. Here we go…